Liberty

  • Abraham Lincoln and the Abolitionists
    by George H. Smith on January 21, 2018 at 12:02 am

    Abraham Lincoln is commonly praised as the greatest president in American history. He was the “Great Emancipator” who freed the slaves by leading the Union in a bloody war that cost 620,000 lives, not to mention hundreds of thousands more men who were maimed and wounded. Perhaps the most prevalent myth about Lincoln is that he engaged in war with the South for the express purpose of emancipating slaves and winning complete civil rights for blacks. Informed historians know, however, […]

  • Event: The State and Future of Education
    by Liz Parker on January 19, 2018 at 3:43 am

    A talk by Marsha Familaro Enright, educational entrepreneur, author of the last chapter, “Liberating Education” in Common Ground on Common Core, editor of Ayn Rand Explained, Lead Developer and Instructor, The Great Connections Seminar for High School and College Students, and Founder and President of Council Oak Montessori School in Chicago for over 26 years.Many of us are aware of the continuing control of Academia by the collectivists, and how they are using […]

  • Do We Need the Department of Education?
    by Liz Parker on January 19, 2018 at 3:41 am

    In the latest edition of Hillsdale College’s Imprimis, Charles Murray recently wrote an excellent piece entitled “Do We Need the Department of Education?” adapted from a 2011 speech of his.He notes that the U.S. Department of Education didn’t come into being until 1980, but large-scale involvement of the federal government in education dates from 1965. In this piece he delves into the historical justifications and evolution of how education came under […]

  • Freethought and Freedom: A Critique of Spinoza
    by George H. Smith on January 19, 2018 at 3:40 am

    George H. Smith criticizes some features of Benedict Spinoza’s political theory, especially his theory of rights.Originally published in essay form on July 24, 2015. […]

  • After Nestor: Henry George and State Socialism
    by Benjamin Tucker on January 19, 2018 at 3:40 am

    Instead of a Book, By a Man Too Busy to Write OnePart Four: Land and Rent Mere Land No Saviour for Labor. (published in Liberty on May 7, 1887)Here is a delicious bit of logic from Mr. George: “If capital, a mere creature of labor, is such an oppressive thing, its creator, when free, can strangle it by refusing to reproduce it.” The italics are mine. If capital is oppressive, it must be oppressive of labor. What difference does it make, then, […]

  • Hungary Introduces "Stop Soros" Legislation To Fend Off Illegal Migrants By "Every Means Possible"
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:34 am

    Hungarian lawmakers previewed a proposed legislation package aimed at stemming the flood of mass illegal migrants through "every means possible," including those who are aided by foreign funded NGOs such as the various organizations tied to billionaire George Soros. The legislative package presented during a Wednesday cabinet meeting has been referred to as the "Stop Soros Act" by government spokesman Zoltan Kovacs, in reference to the 87-year-old US-Hungarian […]

  • Study: College students don't have confidence they'll land a job
    by Jeremy Bauer-Wolf on January 19, 2018 at 3:30 am

    Few college students feel expressly confident that they have the skills and knowledge to find a job or succeed in a workplace, according to a new study. The report from Gallup and Strada Education Network, a former loan guarantor that expanded its mission last year, represents one of the most comprehensive compilations of students opinions’ on this subject -- and the results are “disappointing,” representatives from the organizations say. “Students are not nearly […]

  • When the South Was the Most Progressive Region in America
    by Blain Roberts on January 19, 2018 at 3:23 am

    One hundred and fifty years ago, on January 14, 1868, an extraordinary convention opened in Charleston, South Carolina, the cradle of the Confederacy.That afternoon, a biracial group of men—most of whom were black and some of whom had recently been enslaved—gathered at the elegant Charleston Club House, which had only recently been the refuge of city elite. They came to redraft South Carolina’s uniquely undemocratic constitution. One of nearly a dozen interracial meetings held […]

  • Recent Wave Of Looting Shows Extent Of Hunger In Venezuela
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:22 am

    Authored by Karina Martin via PanamPost.com, The economic crisis and the food shortage in Venezuela is so serious that looting has become commonplace throughout the country. In January alone, nearly 400 small protests and more than 100 instances of looting have taken place across 19 states, according to the Venezuelan Conflict Observatory. On Saturday, January 13, Venezuelans began looting for food in the states of Guárico and Zulia. In Maracaibo […]

  • California's Homeless Problem Revealed In One "Incredible" Video
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:08 am

    Despite the record stock market and unemployment at 4.1% (despite a December jobs miss), the socialist utopia known as California is home to an ever-sprawling tent city which estimated to contain over 1,000 residents. After a ZeroHedge report last March on the sprawling tent cities, a 10-minute video, dubbed by some as "incredible" has emerged showing the shocking growth of the encampment near Angels Stadium in Anaheim, CA along the Santa Ana river.  Locals have […]

  • FBI Investigating Millions Of "Mishandled" Dollars Funneled From Australian Govt To Clinton Foundation
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:06 am

    The FBI has asked retired Australian policeman-turned investigative journalist, Michael Smith, to provide information he has gathered detailing multiple allegations of the Clinton Foundation receiving tens of millions of mishandled taxpayer funds, according to LifeZette.  “I have been asked to provide the FBI with further and better particulars about allegations regarding improper donations to the CF funded by Australian taxpayers,” Smith told […]

  • Sweden Is Preparing For A "Civil War": PM Wants To Deploy Army In No-Go Zones
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 2:58 am

    For the first time since World War II, Sweden is preparing to distribute a civil defense brochure to some 4.7 million households, warning them about the onset of war. The booklet will serve as a manual of "total defense" in case of a war, and provide details on how to secure basic needs such as water, food, and heating, the FT reported. The manual also covers other threats such as cyber attacks, terrorism, and climate change. "All of society needs to be prepared for conflict, not […]

 

Literacy

  • What Education Could Be Like in a Free Society
    by Liz Parker on January 19, 2018 at 3:42 am

    We’re pleased to announce that on Sunday, February 28, 2016, Great Connections Founder and President Marsha Familaro Enright will be guest lecturing at The Maryland Objectivist Society on “The Collectivist Control of Education and What Education Could Be Like in a Free Society.”Her talk coincides with the International Students for Liberty Conference (ISFLC) in Washington, D.C., where we will be exhibiting to promote The Great Connections Seminar in Chicago. If […]

  • The Brightest Students Don’t Get Enough Attention
    by Marsha Familaro Enright on January 19, 2018 at 3:40 am

    A new longitudinal study of 5,000 mathematically precocious children concludes — as I’ve long thought — that very smart students do not get enough attention in school.This is one of the Great Connections' purposes — to provide exceptional learning to exceptional young people, whomever they may be.What happened to “equality” for them? The equality warriors’ bottom line is to bring everyone to the same level, and that’s not the […]

  • The Power of Deep Prioritizing
    by Trent Hamm on January 19, 2018 at 3:39 am

    Not too long ago, I spent an entire workweek without writing a single word for The Simple Dollar or any other writing project for that matter. Yet, this wasn’t a week of vacation or sabbatical or anything like that. What did I do, then? I spent an entire week reading a few relevant books and a stack of articles. I took a lot of notes. I did a lot of brainstorming and very vague outlining. I tried out a few interesting things that I thought were perfectly suited for articles. From a […]

  • The Teaching Muscle I Want to Strengthen in 2018.
    by Dan Meyer on January 19, 2018 at 3:32 am

    [a/k/a 3-Act Task: Suitcase Circle] It’s the muscle that connects my capacity for noticing the world to my capacity for creating mathematical experiences for children. (I should also take some time in 2018 to learn how muscles work.) By way of illustration, this was my favorite tweet of 2017. Gathering some data re: perfect banana ripeness. Have 5 seconds? Fill out a one-question survey! https://t.co/r9UQA1RlC6 #mathchat #MTBoS pic.twitter.com/BrYtUpfa7h — Ilona […]

  • Why Did Two-Thirds of These Weird Antelope Suddenly Drop Dead?
    by Ed Yong on January 19, 2018 at 3:21 am

    It took just three weeks for two-thirds of all the world’s saiga to die. It took much longer to work out why.The saiga is an endearing antelope, whose bulbous nose gives it the comedic air of a Dr. Seuss character. It typically wanders over large tracts of Central Asian grassland, but every spring, tens of thousands of them gather in the same place to give birth. These calving aggregations should be joyous events, but the gathering in May 2015 became something far more sinister when […]

  • Lessons learned in merging a college with another (opinion)
    by Susan Henking on January 19, 2018 at 3:05 am

    In 2009-10, I was an American Council on Education fellow. All who undertake that leadership development preparation have a memorable experience called Pennyfield. Groups of fellows come together as the president and senior staff of Pennyfield College and -- based on a range of information about finance and mission, competitive market complications and national circumstances -- are asked to work together to create a presentation for the college’s Board of Trustees. Teams have about 24 […]

  • Study Questions Value of 'Stackable' Credentials
    by Paul Fain on January 19, 2018 at 3:05 am

    A recently released paper found "only weakly positive and inconsistent gains" in the labor market for stackable credentials, which are defined as certificates and degrees that are awarded in a sequential order, as students progress in their careers. The study by the Community College Research Center at Columbia University's Teachers College, which was released in November, includes several caveats, such as an acknowledgment that estimated earnings gains from stackable credentials may be […]

  • West Virginia Plan for Free Community College
    by Ashley A. Smith on January 19, 2018 at 3:04 am

    The West Virginia Legislature is considering a free community college policy that would require recipients of the tuition-free scholarship to remain in the state for two years after graduation, according to the Charleston Gazette-Mail. The WV Invests Grant would require students to enroll in at least six credit hours a semester and pay for and pass a drug test prior to each new semester. Students would also have to maintain a 2.0 grade point average in order to renew the grant prior to […]

  • How academic blog 'Monkey Cage' became part of the mainstream media
    by Lindsay McKenzie on January 19, 2018 at 3:03 am

    Just over a decade ago, a small group of academics started a political science blog called the “Monkey Cage.” In an inaugural post, the academics wrote that they were tired of political science research being overlooked by the media and policy makers, and set out on a mission to get more people interested in their research. It worked. In the following years, the blog's pool of contributing authors grew substantially. It won awards. And in 2013, the blog attracted the interest of […]

  • New Effort to Reform College Admissions
    by Scott Jaschik on January 19, 2018 at 3:03 am

    A think tank and a legal organization, the Learning Policy Institute and EducationCounsel, are starting a new effort to promote the use of rigorous high school assessments in college admissions decisions. In a policy brief released today, the groups argue that significant progress has been made in creating measures of high school learning that could be used in college admissions. These measures include performance assessment tests, capstone projects and portfolios of learning. The two groups […]

  • A Genetic Clue to Why Stress Makes People Sleepy
    by Veronique Greenwood on January 19, 2018 at 2:53 am

    From an evolutionary perspective, you’d think stressful experiences would require high alertness. But sometimes, stress means going to sleep.One relevant situation you’ve probably experienced—and that you share with a lot of the animal kingdom—is the overwhelming snooziness that comes with fighting off an infection. In some creatures, even overheating triggers a nap. And for certain people, the stress of an argument can send them to slumberland, a take on “fight or […]

  • The "World's Most Bearish Hedge Fund" Has A "Stunning" Theory What Happens Next To The Dollar
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 2:49 am

    After a rollercoaster year, the clients of Horseman Global, which in 2016 we dubbed  the world's most bearish hedge fund when its net exposure hit over -100%... ... finally got some good news when in his December letter, CIO Russell Clark announced that after returning 5.54% for December, the month emerged back in the green for the full year, up a modest 2.27%. However, what caught our attention was not the fund's performance, which after a -24% 2016 barely closed in the […]

Legacy

  • how to thank a new boss who’s been super understanding of a hard time in my life
    by Ask a Manager on January 21, 2018 at 12:26 am

    A reader writes: I’d love your insight on how to thank my new-ish boss for being amazingly understanding over the past few months without going overboard. I work for a major finance firm in the U.S. that has a generous sick/leave policy to begin with. I’ve been with the firm for nearly three years, two of which have been with my former boss and nearly one that has been with my current boss. I’ve always had a stellar record and have performed at the top of my peer group. I am […]

  • Abraham Lincoln and the Abolitionists
    by George H. Smith on January 21, 2018 at 12:02 am

    Abraham Lincoln is commonly praised as the greatest president in American history. He was the “Great Emancipator” who freed the slaves by leading the Union in a bloody war that cost 620,000 lives, not to mention hundreds of thousands more men who were maimed and wounded. Perhaps the most prevalent myth about Lincoln is that he engaged in war with the South for the express purpose of emancipating slaves and winning complete civil rights for blacks. Informed historians know, however, […]

  • Event: The State and Future of Education
    by Liz Parker on January 19, 2018 at 3:43 am

    A talk by Marsha Familaro Enright, educational entrepreneur, author of the last chapter, “Liberating Education” in Common Ground on Common Core, editor of Ayn Rand Explained, Lead Developer and Instructor, The Great Connections Seminar for High School and College Students, and Founder and President of Council Oak Montessori School in Chicago for over 26 years.Many of us are aware of the continuing control of Academia by the collectivists, and how they are using […]

  • Tutor Lauds Student Transformation
    by Marsha Familaro Enright on January 19, 2018 at 3:42 am

    Last fall we received an email message in response to our report on the summer 2015 Great Connections seminar. This email was about Derick Ansah, a spectacular student we had the pleasure of having with us last summer. Derick Ansah, Great Connections class of 2015.  Where I come from, people cannot even picture themselves doing what […]

  • More MBAs Are Going Into Politics
    by Nathan Allen on January 19, 2018 at 3:38 am

    Aravind Krishnan was among the MBA graduates at Harvard Business School’s commencement this year. Courtesy photo It was 1900 when the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College began training students for the master of science in commerce degree. About a decade later, Harvard Business School awarded the first-ever Master of Business Administration. But it wasn’t until a century after that, when HBS grad George W. Bush skimmed by Al Gore — after two recounts, a Supreme Court […]

  • Salary Gender Gap Persists For Biz Grads
    by Nathan Allen on January 19, 2018 at 3:36 am

    WomenLead Power Networking event. Courtesy photo Remember the days when men and women were equally compensated for their education and job title? No? Oh yeah, that’s because it hasn’t happened yet. According to a study published today (January 18), the gender gap in salary remains. New year, same problem. Universum, a market insights research firm, asked more than half a million business and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) students at universities […]

  • 4 Social Security Statistics That Are Actually Scary
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:32 am

    Submitted by Brenton Smith, this article originally appeared in NewsMax.Com, (“No Way Around Sorry Shape Social Security Is In ”) No Way Around Sorry Shape Social Security Is In So you think you are worried about Social Security? Many are, but their fear is generally misplaced. At this point, fear is pretty much limited to falling benefit levels as a result of Congressional inaction. As I am sure that you have heard, seniors’ paychecks will fall by 23 percent if […]

  • Academic Minute: Engineering Living Tissue for Transplantation
    by Doug Lederman on January 19, 2018 at 3:29 am

    Today on the Academic Minute, Pankaj Karande, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, explores the new ways science is pushing the boundaries to fill the organ-donor gap. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.   Is this diversity newsletter?: Hide by line?: Is this Career Advice newsletter?: Trending:&nbs […]

  • Hamilton: A 50% Fall In Net Worth Likely Dead Ahead...
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:20 am

    Authored by Chris Hamilton via Econimica blog, Private investment (yellow line in the chart below) makes up just under 17% of US GDP, government consumption about the same, and the remainder of GDP is private consumption (mostly services...detailed HERE).  But it is the year over year change in private investment that seems to offer the greatest insight into the economic health of the nation.  It turns out that private […]

  • This Is How Drug Lords Make Billions Smuggling Gold To Miami
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:15 am

    Much of the gold used to make the components for your smartphone, or the gold band for your engagement ring, has a secret criminal history that, before a stunning report published by the Miami Herald on Tuesday, wasn’t widely known to the US public. In parts of Peru, drug cartels operate illegal gold mines to pull the lucrative gold metal out of the Earth. Much of this inventory is then sold to multinational companies, where illegally harvested gold blends with the legitimate supply […]

  • Skunk Works Exec Hints US Hypersonic Bomber Has "Already Been Made"
    by Tyler Durden on January 19, 2018 at 3:14 am

    Last week we noted that  “hypersonic aircraft and missiles are being developed and tested by the United States, Russia, and China at an accelerating pace.” The race for hypersonic technologies has flourished among global superpowers, who realize that the first to possess these technologies will revolutionize their civilian and military programs. Curiously, Lockheed Martin’s mysterious Skunk Works team might have just spilled the beans about a completed […]

  • Eating the Young
    by Matt Reed on January 19, 2018 at 3:09 am

    Blog: Confessions of a Community College DeanI’ve been impressively nearsighted since childhood, so I’ve spent more than my share of time in optometrists’ offices. They have a mechanism that fits poorly over the face, with which one eye’s view is blocked while the other goes through a series of different lenses, trying to read the chart. (“Which is better - one, or two? Three, or four?”) Somehow I never see quite as well with either eye as I do with […]

Vocation

  • Please Just Tell Me
    on January 19, 2018 at 3:07 am

    Submitted by: (via The Meta Picture) Share on Facebook […]

  • How Rural Students Define the American Dream
    by Magdalena Slapik on January 16, 2018 at 11:13 pm

    The belief that if a person works hard enough she can become financially successful, regardless of existing barriers to opportunity, is integral to the American mythos of meritocracy. But a 2011 Pew Charitable Trust poll found that many Americans—whether they are living in cities, small towns, or rural communities—share pessimism about upward mobility.Rural communities experience higher rates of poverty and lower rates of college completion than urban communities, making upward […]

  • Employers Are Looking for Job Candidates in the Wrong Places
    by Lolade Fadulu on January 16, 2018 at 11:13 pm

    The employers who can’t seem to fill the United States’s roughly 6 million vacant jobs are at a loss for what to do. Qualified candidates are seemingly nowhere to be found. In Washington, D.C., for example, there aren’t enough workers who have the healthcare-management or sales skills to meet the demands of the hospitals and retail stores and banks desperate to hire, according to a report by LinkedIn’s Economic Graph Team. Philadelphia has so many job openings that […]

  • The Irony of Specialized High Schools
    by Tori Latham on January 16, 2018 at 11:13 pm

    For all four years of high school I spent half of every day dancing. And not just casual, because-I-felt-like-it dancing (although that did happen every now and then), but full-out, pre-professional ballet and modern dancing. Pink or black tights, leotards, and ballet buns were a requirement, not a suggestion.So, it would make sense to assume that I’m writing this as a dancer. But alas, a dancer I am not. (Unless you include the times I catch myself in another bout of […]

  • I Have Big Reservations About Chalkbeat’s Teaching Competition
    by Dan Meyer on January 16, 2018 at 9:46 pm

    At SXSW, Chalkbeat is hosting The Great American Teach Off: Top Chef. Project Runway. The Voice. Live competition shows have introduced audiences to the worlds of cooking, fashion, and singing — and opened a window into the intricate craftsmanship that these industries demand. Now it’s time for one of America’s most under-recognized professions to get the same treatment. Hi, teachers!! Two teams of math teachers will teach a lesson to a live audience and receive judgment […]