Well, Son of a Biscuit: Swearing Correlated with Honesty

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Trustworthiness decidedly corresponded with all foulness measures, the analysts compose, implying that members lied less on the Lie scale on the off chance that they recorded a higher number of oftentimes utilized and loved to revile words or self-announced higher obscenity use in their regular daily existences, notwithstanding when controlling for age and sexual orientation. Foulness and genuineness were observed to be fundamentally and decidedly connected, demonstrating that the individuals who utilized greater irreverence were more legit in their Facebook notices, the Feldman and associates compose.

Key Takeaways:

  • Managing expectations about swearing and profanity in the workplace can be particularly contentious: There have been several workplace lawsuits brought by employees who lost their %&#*-ing jobs because of profane language at work.
  • A new study conducted by an international team of researchers from the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Hong Kong has found evidence that a little swearing may not be so bad for business after all.
  • While we might associate profanity with negative character traits, like dishonesty or aggression, lead author Gilad Feldman (Maastricht University) and colleagues found that, in reality, people who swear like sailors may actually be more honest.

“While we might associate profanity with negative character traits, like dishonesty or aggression, lead author Gilad Feldman (Maastricht University) and colleagues found that, in reality, people who swear like sailors may actually be more honest.”

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/minds-business/well-son-of-a-biscuit-swearing-correlated-with-honesty.html

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